Rebecca Howard

Born: Manchester, United Kingdom
Lives: Glasgow, United Kingdom

Rebecca Howard is an artist and producer from the U.K; her practice seeks to explore notions of dialogue and interaction, as well as the efficacy of forms such as sound, printed text and symposiums in establishing a new mode of exchange.

In the Autumn of 2013, Rebecca was a Resident Curator at Node Centre for Curatorial Studies, Berlin. Last year her writing was featured in Oblivion, a book published by Broken Dimanche Press to coincide with the exhibition Oblivion, curated by Elisa Rusca, at Zweigstelle Gallery, Berlin. Most recently, Rebecca presented new works in a group shows at Embassy Gallery, Edinburgh, Scotland and at Cuchifritos Gallery and Project Space, New York. Rebecca was awarded the 6 month LES Studio Programme residency with Artist Alliance inc in NYC and she is now currently serving as a programme co-ordinator at The Telfer Gallery, Glasgow.

Education

2013
  • BA(hons), Intermedia Art
    Edinburgh College of Art, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Selected Group Exhibitions

2014
  • Pretty Vacant
    Lakatan, Budapest, United Kingdom
  • Heading Southwest [About Practice#2]
    Cuchifritos Gallery + Project Space, New York, New York
  • Give & Get/ Have & Take
    Something Felix Gallery, Boston, Massachusetts
  • Klapaucius
    Embassy Gallery, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
2013
  • Expensive Space
    Whitespace Gallery, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • You're Not From 'round Here
    Assembly, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
2012
  • It's Not Your Birthday Anymore
    Old Ambulance Depot, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • Salon Neu
    Embassy Gallery, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • TMPRLT
    Avalanche Records, Edinburgh, United Kingdom
2011
  • Video Works
    The Brass Monkey, Edinburgh, United Kingdom

Selected Awards and Grants

2014
  • L.E.S Studio Programme
    Artist Alliance Inc., New York, United Kingdom
2013
  • Curator in Residence
    Node Centre for Curatorial Studies, Berlin, Germany

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