Natasha Sweeten

Born: Lexington, Kentucky
Lives: Brooklyn, New York

I see the imagination as a fundamental ingredient of human life. Likewise, it plays a significant role in painting, as painting requires a swift, psychological shift to turn a thought or idea into physical matter. When I paint, I imagine the forms I use to possess distinct personalities, which in turn become my tools for working. With them I create a narrative for each piece, putting into play several methods of paint application and removal in order to set up unanticipated relationships. Although abstract, my work is rooted in the real world, inspired by forms in nature and architecture. Each painting is built --- or evolves --- element by element, and the end result cannot be preconceived. This to me is an exciting challenge.

Education

1996
  • MFA, Painting
    Bard College, Annandale, New York
1993
  • BFA, Painting, Sculpture
    Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, Ohio
  • BFA, Painting, Sculpture
    Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, Ohio

Selected Solo Exhibitions

2006
2004
  • Natasha Sweeten: Call This Home
    East Gallery, Brooklyn, New York
  • Natasha Sweeten: A Mini Retrospective
    Realform Project Space, Brooklyn, New York

Selected Group Exhibitions

2010
2009
2008
  • Painters & Sculptors Make Prints
    Crisp-Ellert Art Museum, St. Augustine, Florida
  • Gallery Artists: New Works
    Edward Thorp Gallery, New York, New York
2005
  • Sextet
    Zg Gallery, Chicago, Illinois
  • Drawn to Cleveland
    Museum of Contemporary Art, Cleveland, Ohio
  • NY (hearts) LV
    Dust Gallery, Las Vegas, Nevada
2004
2003
  • Twisting and Turning
    Blue Star Contemporary Art Center, San Antonio, Texas
2001
  • New York: Fantasy Island
    Karl Drerup Art Gallery, Plymouth State College, Plymouth, New Hampshire
2000
  • DrawnTogether
    Reinberger Galleries, Cleveland Institute of Art, Cleveland, Ohio
1999
  • Compliments
    Educational Alliance, New York, New York

Selected Bibliography

2006

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